Category Archives: Unity

HighByte to Unity3D with SparkplugB

Successfully connected HighByte Intelligence Hub to Unity3D with SparkplugB! ✔

👀 I am sending data from my Automation-Gateway.com to the Intelligence Hub via OPC UA, then the values are published from HighByte to MQTT with the Intelligence Hub SparkplugB connector and then getting consumed in Unity with the MQTT SparkplugB Asset.

👍 Works straight forward and was easy to setup!

🧐 Sparkplug Learning: If a Host Application is not the Primary Host of an Edge Node and it starts up after the Edge Node, it must send the Rebirth command to the Edge Nodes in which it is interested in, to get a birth message with the current/initial values of all the metrics of the nodes. My Unity client ignores incoming metrics of DATA messages which it has not seen before in a BIRTH message…

MQTT for Unity

“MQTT for Unity” is a Unity Package designed to seamlessly integrate MQTT (Message Queuing Telemetry Transport) functionality into Unity projects, offering a user-friendly solution for enabling real-time communication and data exchange within Unity applications.

Tested on Windows, OSX, WebGL, UWP + HoloLens2, and Android. iOS not tested, but should work as well.

You can find it at the Unity Asset Store here

Key Features:

  1. Streamlined Integration: “MQTT for Unity” provides a straightforward and hassle-free integration process, enabling developers to quickly set up MQTT communication in their Unity projects.
  2. Real-Time Communication: Harness the power of MQTT to establish real-time communication channels within your Unity application, perfect for multiplayer games, IoT applications, and more.
  3. Customizable Configuration: Easily configure MQTT parameters, such as broker settings, topic subscriptions, and message handling, to tailor the communication to your specific project needs.
  4. Cross-Platform Compatibility: “MQTT for Unity” is designed to work seamlessly across various Unity-supported platforms, including Windows, OSX, WebGL, UWP + HoloLens2, and Android. iOS not tested, but should work as well.

With “MQTT for Unity,” developers can unlock the potential of MQTT communication in their Unity applications without the complexities of manual integration, making it an essential tool for creating interactive and connected experiences in Unity.

Online documentation can be found here.

Unity3D in WinCC Open Architecture

This article is about integrating your 3D Unity applications into WinCC Open Architecture SCADA HMI Web screens and exchanging property values. It only works with the WinCC Ultralight Web Client. Because the native Ui does not support WebGL in the WebView Widget. Update: It should also work in the native Ui, you just have to set the environment variable: QTWEBENGINE_CHROMIUM_FLAGS=–enable-gpu

With this free Unity Asset you can create a Unity application with an interface to the SCADA system in an easy way. Don’t be confused about the name of the Asset “WinCC Unified Custom Web Control”. This is because initially it was build to create Custom Web Controls for WinCC Unified only. But there is now also an option to create a build of your Unity application for WinCC Open Architecture.

First create and build your Unity Application as described in the documentation of the Asset. You may also watch this video.

Just at the end execute the menu item to create a WinCC Open Architecture application, instead of WinCC Unified.

Create and load the WebView

Then copy the ZIP file to your WinCC OA project into the folder “data\html” and unzip the ZIP (for example C:\WinCC_OA_Proj\Test\data\html\UnityCustomControl).

In this tutorial our application is named “UnityCustomControl”. You have to replace this with the name of your Unity application.

Then you must insert a WebView into your screen.

And then you must load the generated Unity application in the Initialize script of the widget.

main()
{
   this.loadSnippet("/data/html/UnityCustomControl/index.html");
}

In the Property Editor at the Extended tab be sure to set the “ulcClientSideWidget” to TRUE.

Set and receive property values

To send values from your WinCC Open Architecture to the Unity application you must use execJsFunction of the Webview and call the “setPropertyInUnity” function with the property and the value which you want to set. See the following example.

UnityCustomControl.execJsFunction("setPropertyInUnity", "target_shoulder_link", 10);

“UnityCustomControl” is the name of our Webview Widget! It’s up to you how you name it.

At the WebView there is an event “messageReceived”. There you will get all the messages which are sent from Unity to WinCC Open Architecture. See the example for the structure of the parameter. It is always a JSON document which contains the Name and the Value of the property which has been sent.

Receiving Property Values:
WCCOAui2:["messageReceived"][mapping 3 items
WCCOAui2:   "uuid" : 2
WCCOAui2:   "command" : "msgToCtrl"
WCCOAui2:   "params" : mapping 2 items
WCCOAui2:	   "Name" : "test_property"
WCCOAui2:	   "Value" : "Hello World 1"
WCCOAui2:]

The very first message does not have any “params”, this message comes when the initialization of Unity is done.

First Message:
WCCOAui2:["messageReceived"][mapping 2 items
WCCOAui2:   "uuid" : 1
WCCOAui2:   "command" : "msgToCtrl"
WCCOAui2:]

Start Ultralight Web Client

Start a Control Manager with the “webclient_http.ctl” script.

Then you can open the application in the browser with “https://localhost/data/ulc/start.html”.

Sending OPC UA Data with GraphQL to Unity…

In a simple setup I have tested to send 2000 value changes per second from an OPC UA server to Unity with GraphQL, the Open-Source Frankenstein Automation Gateway, and the GraphQL for Unity Asset. And it could go up to 10000 value changes per second…

I had one DotNet OPC UA server with a lot of simulated tags with random data. The .Net OPC UA server is the DotNet reference implementation from the OPCFoundation, which can be found here.

On top of that the Open-Source Frankenstein Automation Gateway for GraphQL was running. It is connected to the OPC UA server. It offers a GraphQL interface to the tags of one or more connected OPC UA servers.

In Unity I had used the GraphQL for OPC UA Asset to easily connect to the Gateway, browse the tags, and subscribe to the value changes of 100 tags.

Each tag was changed by the OPC UA server every 45ms. This ends up in a bit more than 2000 value changes per seconds, which were sent from the OPC UA server to the Unity Application.

Here we see the Application running 3 times on my Laptop with an Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-9850H CPU @ 2.60GHz. In the center you see the amount of incoming value changes per second (red number). Around that number, we see some of the values coming in from OPC UA. At the bottom we see the CPU load of the Frankenstein Automation Gateway (java program) and the OPC UA DotNet Server. Both were running on an old Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-6100U CPU @ 2.30GHz.

It was also possible to increase to load up to 10000 value changes per seconds! Sending 100 values every 10ms from OPC UA to Unity…